Workshop Leaders for Womankind 2016

 Gena Adams-Riley

Gena Adams-Riley speaks on Mindfulness Meditation to all ages, from elementary school students and their parents to college students and St. James’s parishioners. As a workshop presenter, she will encourage you to connect with the stillness and silence already within you, freeing you from your mind to live awake in the moment trusting the process of life’s unfolding as you quietly watch, listen, wait and breathe. Episcopal priest, mother of two mindfulness-endurance-building boys and sober since 1991, Gena grew up in Vermont and landed in Richmond in 2008.

Jill Baughan

Author and speaker Jill Baughan will lead a workshop on Finding Joy (and Even Fun!) in Every Season of the Soul. No stranger to painful experiences, including the sudden death of her father and a long battle with infertility, Jill believes joy and sorrow walk hand-in-hand in everyone’s lives. She helps people unleash the power of play and see how it can be used to break down barriers, decrease stress, create community and cheer up someone in crisis. Author of “Born To Be Wild: Rediscover the Freedom of Fun,” Jill spent many years as an English instructor at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Nichole Flores

Dr. Nichole M. Flores is assistant professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia. She earned a Ph.D. in theological ethics from Boston College, a M.Div. from Yale Divinity School, and a A.B. from Smith College. Dr. Flores equips Christians and the broader public with a deeper understanding of the gifts, perspectives, and concerns of Latina/o populations in the United States. Her academic work draws connections between situations of human suffering—human trafficking, labor exploitation, and sexual abuse—and the rich theological traditions that inspire resistance to social injustice. Dr. Flores is a blogger for Catholic Moral Theology and she has published articles for the Washington Post On Faith Blog and America Magazine. In 2015, Dr. Flores was honored with the Catherine Mowry LaCugna Award for New Scholars from the Catholic Theological Society of America and the Circle of Change Award from Building Bridges for contributions to positive social transformation.

Tracy Radosevic

Tracy Radosevic is a dynamic, energetic, internationally-acclaimed storyteller, whose favorite stories come from the Bible. Her interactive workshop will bring the Bible to life and captivate the audience, involving them into the story she is telling. Tracy has a knack for moving people out of themselves to the bigger picture. An educator and facilitator, she has traveled the U.S. and to several foreign countries, bringing her special brand of humor, insight and faith to audiences of all ages through the power of narrative.

Nicole Unice

Part bible teacher, part community organizer, part busy mom — Nicole Unice has the uncanny ability to relate to people in all ages and stages of life with her “keeping it real” approach to ordering a life around God’s work. Ministry Director at Hope Church and author of “Brave Enough: Getting Over Our Fears, Flaws, and Failures to Live Bold and Free,” Nicole will speak about how we cannot avoid conflict in our relationships with family members, friends, coworkers and strangers, but we can consider how the Holy Spirit strengthens us for conflict and allows us to engage with love, power, grace and compassion.

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Janie Walker

After working in several different areas of ministry including community development, pastoral care, prayer and counseling, Rev. Janie Walker now serves as the Interim Pastoral Director at Richmond Hill, an ecumenical Christian fellowship and residential community whose mission is to seek God’s healing of Metropolitan Richmond through prayer, hospitality, racial reconciliation and spiritual development. A mother and grandmother with a desire to see healing and wholeness in people and religious institutions, Janie’s workshop will speak to compassion in the community.

2016 Schedule and Workshops

WomanKind was founded by women to give women a safe space to explore topics of faith in a supportive, encouraging environment. To preserve the special experience of WomanKind, the events on February 23 & 24 are open to women only.

Friday, February 23
6:00 p.m. Registration
Cocktail Reception and Book Signing
7:30 p.m. Friday Keynote: The Reverend Nichelle R. Guidry, Liaison to Worship and Arts Ministries, Office of the Senior Pastor at Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago, and author of Curating a World: Sermonic Words from a Young Woman Who Preaches
9:00 p.m. Adjourn
Saturday, February 24
8:15 a.m. Registration, Coffee
9:00 a.m. Hymn Sing
9:30 a.m. Saturday Keynote:  Sara Miles,  founder The Food Pantry , former Director of Ministry at St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church in San Francisco, and author of Take This Bread: A Radical Conversion and Jesus Freak: Feeding Healing Raising the Dead
11:00 a.m. Workshops, Session 1 **
12:15 p.m. Lunch and Book Signing
1:30 p.m. Workshops, Session 2 **
2:45 p.m. Holy Eucharist
Emily Scott, ordained Evangelical Lutheran pastor and founder of St. Lydia’s, a Dinner Church in New York, Preacher
4:30 p.m. Adjourn

** These workshops will be offered in the morning and the afternoon. Please select your preferences on the registration page when you indicate the registration you desire.

Emily Scott - The Discomforting Table: The Power of Table Practice to Nurture Justice Making

“The world begins at a kitchen table,” writes poet Joy Harjo. Perhaps the revolution begins at the table too. Emily Scott, former and founding pastor of St. Lydia’s Dinner Church in Brooklyn, will share stories drawn from eight years sharing a “sacred meal” around the tables and St. Lydia’s. What does it mean when communion is a meal, cooked with human hands, and shared at the tables? How does it change our experience of the Eucharist, and our relationship to hunger? At the table, the St. Lydia’s community developed a set of practices that equipped them to turn toward their neighbors, build relationships across boundaries, and work together for justice. This workshop will explore the power of practice in forming a justice-focused congregation, and how these practices might be explored in a wide variety of church settings, like yours!

Martha Rollins and Danita Rountree Green - Coming to the Table: Having the Clumsy, Courageous Conversation on Race

Inspired by the vision of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in his “I Have a Dream” speech that one day “the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood, two women (with different backgrounds but share the same history) have come together at the table. But can descendants of slaves and of the enslavers form rich and lasting relationships? How are they promoting racial equality and social justice at their own dinner tables? Join Coming To The Table-RVA Co-conveners Martha Rollins and Danita Rountree Green as they explore the challenges of reaching across racial, political and societal lines together. Coming To The Table-RVA is part of a national organization committed to racial healing and social equity. Coming To The Table’s vision is for a just and truthful society that acknowledges and seeks to heal from the racial wounds of the past by: Uncovering History, Making Connections, Working Toward Healing, and Taking Action.

Martha Bourlakas - Maw’s Homemade Applesauce, or What Our Meal Memories Teach Us About the Authentic Hospitality of Jesus Christ

Please come to this workshop hungry. Hungry for words. Hungry to share the significant meal memories of your life. Hungry to hear and connect with the stories of others. In sharing our stories about the meals of our lives, we will distill the important words and themes of authentic Christian hospitality, far more buttery and divine than secular definitions of hospitality. We will chew on the individual and corporate roles we have in bringing more Christian hospitality into the world. We will work on a menu of ways to create food community and hope for people who desperately need to share a bounteous meal with people who love.

Dana Corsello - The Body, the Blood, the Intimacy:  What it Really Means to Get Real with Jesus

This workshop will explore the theology of the Last Supper through scripture, literature, and film as a means of feeling true intimacy with God and by extension with one another.

Ana Hernandez - Listening Around the Table: Skills for Healthy Community Life

How can we be God for one another? We begin by finding and nurturing God in us. In this workshop we will learn to use chants as icons (from the Greek eikon, meaning “likeness, image”) of divine presence. We will tease her and coax her out from her hiding places. She will leap out and surprise us when we least expect it. We will find places of comfort and repose, and also begin to negotiate the places where we may not be very comfortable at all! When we show up as our authentic selves, and encourage one another, channels of grace and play open and co-creation and possibility walk into the room and our hearts. When we make time to reflect on our lives as an image of divine presence, we make more love. We become that love insofar as we join with others in attending to the sense of how we sing what we sing (and for whom we sing it) reflecting on the things we tell ourselves and others, and learning to make our lives a continual offering. This is the way of peace and freedom (and laughter, and improvisation). Warning: You may have epiphanies in the context of group learning, and transformation and fun are highly likely to occur.

Elaine Ellis Thomas and Brenda Brown-Grooms - Hate Has No Home Here:  Proclaiming God’s Word in the Public Sphere

When waves of white supremacists, white nationalists, and Ku Klux Klan descended on Charlottesville in the summer of 2017, it took a broad cross-section of the community, including faith leaders, to plan and execute the counter protests.  People came together across age, class, ethnicity, religion, and race to proclaim that hate has no place here.  Pastors Brenda Brown-Grooms and Elaine Ellis Thomas helped lead the coordinated efforts to stand in the breach between the sowers of hate and those they sought to harm.  Throughout the experience, people stayed grounded in prayer, trust, collaboration and courage. Come to the workshop to learn how what happened in Charlottesville became a symbol of love over fear.

Phoebe Roaf - The Heart of the Matter:  Examining Jeremiah's Understanding of God's Justice and Judgment

The Old Testament prophet Jeremiah lived during a period of great upheaval in Israel's history.  He experienced the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, a time of intense suffering for his people.  While Jeremiah lamented the sinfulness of his generation, he also conveyed a sense of hope for the future.  In this workshop, we will explore the parallels between life during the time of Jeremiah and our lives as 21st century Americans.  What does God's judgment look like?  What does God's justice look like?  Where are the signs of hope in today's world?  Together we will consider how to remain faithful to God's priorities and have a sense of hope for the future.

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2018 Schedule and Workshops

WomanKind was founded by women to give women a safe space to explore topics of faith in a supportive, encouraging environment. To preserve the special experience of WomanKind, the events on February 23 & 24 are open to women only.

Friday, February 23
6:00 p.m. Registration
Cocktail Reception and Book Signing
7:30 p.m. Friday Keynote: The Reverend Nichelle R. Guidry, Liaison to Worship and Arts Ministries, Office of the Senior Pastor at Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago, and author of Curating a World: Sermonic Words from a Young Woman Who Preaches
9:00 p.m. Adjourn
Saturday, February 24
8:15 a.m. Registration, Coffee
9:00 a.m. Hymn Sing
9:30 a.m. Saturday Keynote:  Sara Miles,  founder The Food Pantry , former Director of Ministry at St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church in San Francisco, and author of Take This Bread: A Radical Conversion and Jesus Freak: Feeding Healing Raising the Dead
11:00 a.m. Workshops, Session 1 **
12:15 p.m. Lunch and Book Signing
1:30 p.m. Workshops, Session 2 **
2:45 p.m. Holy Eucharist
Emily Scott, ordained Evangelical Lutheran pastor and founder of St. Lydia’s, a Dinner Church in New York, Preacher
4:30 p.m. Adjourn

** These workshops will be offered in the morning and the afternoon. Please select your preferences on the registration page when you indicate the registration you desire.

Emily Scott - The Discomforting Table: The Power of Table Practice to Nurture Justice Making

“The world begins at a kitchen table,” writes poet Joy Harjo. Perhaps the revolution begins at the table too. Emily Scott, former and founding pastor of St. Lydia’s Dinner Church in Brooklyn, will share stories drawn from eight years sharing a “sacred meal” around the tables and St. Lydia’s. What does it mean when communion is a meal, cooked with human hands, and shared at the tables? How does it change our experience of the Eucharist, and our relationship to hunger? At the table, the St. Lydia’s community developed a set of practices that equipped them to turn toward their neighbors, build relationships across boundaries, and work together for justice. This workshop will explore the power of practice in forming a justice-focused congregation, and how these practices might be explored in a wide variety of church settings, like yours!

Martha Rollins and Danita Rountree Green - Coming to the Table: Having the Clumsy, Courageous Conversation on Race

Inspired by the vision of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in his “I Have a Dream” speech that one day “the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood, two women (with different backgrounds but share the same history) have come together at the table. But can descendants of slaves and of the enslavers form rich and lasting relationships? How are they promoting racial equality and social justice at their own dinner tables? Join Coming To The Table-RVA Co-conveners Martha Rollins and Danita Rountree Green as they explore the challenges of reaching across racial, political and societal lines together. Coming To The Table-RVA is part of a national organization committed to racial healing and social equity. Coming To The Table’s vision is for a just and truthful society that acknowledges and seeks to heal from the racial wounds of the past by: Uncovering History, Making Connections, Working Toward Healing, and Taking Action.

Martha Bourlakas - Maw’s Homemade Applesauce, or What Our Meal Memories Teach Us About the Authentic Hospitality of Jesus Christ

Please come to this workshop hungry. Hungry for words. Hungry to share the significant meal memories of your life. Hungry to hear and connect with the stories of others. In sharing our stories about the meals of our lives, we will distill the important words and themes of authentic Christian hospitality, far more buttery and divine than secular definitions of hospitality. We will chew on the individual and corporate roles we have in bringing more Christian hospitality into the world. We will work on a menu of ways to create food community and hope for people who desperately need to share a bounteous meal with people who love.

Dana Corsello - The Body, the Blood, the Intimacy:  What it Really Means to Get Real with Jesus

This workshop will explore the theology of the Last Supper through scripture, literature, and film as a means of feeling true intimacy with God and by extension with one another.

Ana Hernandez - Listening Around the Table: Skills for Healthy Community Life

How can we be God for one another? We begin by finding and nurturing God in us. In this workshop we will learn to use chants as icons (from the Greek eikon, meaning “likeness, image”) of divine presence. We will tease her and coax her out from her hiding places. She will leap out and surprise us when we least expect it. We will find places of comfort and repose, and also begin to negotiate the places where we may not be very comfortable at all! When we show up as our authentic selves, and encourage one another, channels of grace and play open and co-creation and possibility walk into the room and our hearts. When we make time to reflect on our lives as an image of divine presence, we make more love. We become that love insofar as we join with others in attending to the sense of how we sing what we sing (and for whom we sing it) reflecting on the things we tell ourselves and others, and learning to make our lives a continual offering. This is the way of peace and freedom (and laughter, and improvisation). Warning: You may have epiphanies in the context of group learning, and transformation and fun are highly likely to occur.

Elaine Ellis Thomas and Brenda Brown-Grooms - Hate Has No Home Here:  Proclaiming God’s Word in the Public Sphere

When waves of white supremacists, white nationalists, and Ku Klux Klan descended on Charlottesville in the summer of 2017, it took a broad cross-section of the community, including faith leaders, to plan and execute the counter protests.  People came together across age, class, ethnicity, religion, and race to proclaim that hate has no place here.  Pastors Brenda Brown-Grooms and Elaine Ellis Thomas helped lead the coordinated efforts to stand in the breach between the sowers of hate and those they sought to harm.  Throughout the experience, people stayed grounded in prayer, trust, collaboration and courage. Come to the workshop to learn how what happened in Charlottesville became a symbol of love over fear.

Phoebe Roaf - The Heart of the Matter:  Examining Jeremiah's Understanding of God's Justice and Judgment

The Old Testament prophet Jeremiah lived during a period of great upheaval in Israel's history.  He experienced the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, a time of intense suffering for his people.  While Jeremiah lamented the sinfulness of his generation, he also conveyed a sense of hope for the future.  In this workshop, we will explore the parallels between life during the time of Jeremiah and our lives as 21st century Americans.  What does God's judgment look like?  What does God's justice look like?  Where are the signs of hope in today's world?  Together we will consider how to remain faithful to God's priorities and have a sense of hope for the future.

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